Update 1 of: Recent Progress in Development of Dopamine Receptor Subtype-Selective Agents: Potential Therapeutics for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders

Update 1 of: Recent Progress in Development of Dopamine Receptor Subtype-Selective Agents: Potential Therapeutics for Neurological and Psychiatric Disorders.

Ye NNeumeyer JLBaldessarini RJZhen XZhang A.

Chemical Reviews. IF 41.298, 2013113 (5): PR123–178.

Dopamine (DA) is a critical neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system (CNS). The cerebral dopaminergic system is implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurobehavioral disorders, including Parkinson’s disease and other movement and hyperactivity disorders,  schizophrenia, mania, depression, substance abuse, and eating disorders, and it is involved in the neuropharmacology of drugs proven eective in the treatment of most of these neuropsychiatric disorders. DA contributes importantly to the neurophysiological control of arousal and attention, initiation of movement,perception, motivation, and emotion. Its actions are mediated by five major DA receptor subtypes (D1−D5) with distinct dierences in their gene and peptide composition, molecular functions, and neuropharmacology. These receptors represent rational targets for development of both drugs and radioligands. In recent years, substantial eorts have been directed at the more recently described DA receptor types, D3, D4, and D5, as well as the longer-known and more abundant D1and D2 receptors. Current trends in medicinal chemistry and neuropharmacology include development of D1 full agonists and D2 partial agonists as well as agents with dopaminergic activity combined with eects at CNS serotonergic, muscarinic, adrenergic, and histaminic receptors. This review focuses on progress during 2006−2011 on the development of selective ligands targeting mainly to the five main DA receptors.